CULTURE

  • From 'Reservation Dogs' to 'Rutherford Falls,' Native people are having a moment on TV
    From 'Reservation Dogs' to 'Rutherford Falls,' Native people are having a moment on TV

    When the character Bear is visited by the spirit of an unknown warrior in the series premiere of "Reservation Dogs," he asks if the man before him is "Crazy Horse" or another legendary Native American leader. It turns out, however, that the man in the beads and feathers is not the kind of brave or formidable Native hero long romanticized in Hollywood.

TRAVEL

  • Hawai‘i Is Not Our Playground
    Hawai‘i Is Not Our Playground

    For years, Hawai‘i has been packaged as a picturesque paradise. A place where mainland travelers could forget the worries of home. The problem? Hawai‘i’s land, history, and people are often ignored or trampled. Chris Colin reports on the locals who are pushing back.

FOOD

  • Coffee may reduce risk of death from stroke and heart disease
    Coffee may reduce risk of death from stroke and heart disease

    Among people with no diagnosis of heart disease, regular coffee consumption of 0.5 to 3 cups of coffee a day was associated with a decreased risk of death from heart disease, stroke and early death from any cause when compared to non-coffee drinkers.

LIFESTYLE

  • Catholic high school wrongly fired gay substitute teacher, federal judge rules
    Catholic high school wrongly fired gay substitute teacher, federal judge rules

    A Catholic high school in North Carolina wrongfully terminated a gay substitute teacher after he announced plans to marry his partner in 2014, a federal judge ruled Friday.

    In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Max Cogburn said the Charlotte Catholic High School violated federal sex discrimination laws when it fired Lonnie Billard.

FEATURES

HEALTH

  • Covid trends like ivermectin are deadly distractions. Why can't we stop them?
    Covid trends like ivermectin are deadly distractions. Why can't we stop them?

    "You are not a horse. You are not a cow. Seriously, y'all. Stop it." This actual tweet from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration sounds better suited for an April Fool’s Day joke than for an actual federal health advisory posted just days before the FDA fully approved Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine for those 16 and older.