Native Americans fight for items looted from bodies at Wounded Knee

Culture September 13, 2022 Culture
Native Americans fight for items looted from bodies at Wounded Knee

Peace offerings of tobacco ties adorn the fence at the Wounded Knee Memorial on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakot

From The Washington Post | History by Dana Hedgpeth

With the flashlight from her smartphone, Renee Iron Hawk peered into the dust-covered glass and wood cabinets inside a small, dark museum in Barre, Mass.

She and a handful of other American Indians looked at pairs of beaded moccasins, a dozen ceremonial pipes, and a few cradleboards, used by women to carry infants on their backs. The items are among as many as 200 artifacts that were stolen from the bodies of the 250 Lakota men, women and children slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1890 during the Wounded Knee massacre in South Dakota. They’d ended up in an obscure museum attached to a public library in a rural town 70 miles from Boston.

How a collection from one of history’s worst atrocities against American Indians ended up in Barre is almost as painful as the memory of the massacre.

Photo by Nikki Kahn / The Washington Post

Read More at The Washington Post